Fairy Tale Generator

For the next assignment in Reading and Writing Electronic Text, I created a fairy tale generator. The generator is based on tutorials from tracery and natural language processing. Fairy tales share common themes, such as religion, justice, humility, and cleverness. I sought to explore how generative text may shift the terms of an agreement.

In the original story in Grimms’ Fairy Tales, a peasant tricked the devil. One day the peasant saw the devil sitting on treasure in a field. The devil told the peasant that he will give him half of everything that the peasant’s field produces for two years. The peasant agreed, stating that everything above the ground will belong to the devil and everything below will belong to the peasant.

When harvest time came the devil only found withered leaves and the happy peasant dug turnips. The next time the devil told the peasant that everything above the ground would belong to the peasant and everything below would belong to the devil. The peasant planted wheat and cut the full stack at ground level. When the devil came he found nothing but the stubble. In the end, the peasant won the treasure.

In my generator, I identified subjects, past tense verbs, adjectives, nouns, and prepositions. In the text I replaced several nouns, verbs, and adjectives with the same parts of speech in the sentences. Sometimes I added an origin, which consisted of randomized subjects that added a comical twist to my story. I retained several features of the story, such as the peasant and devil characters. The treasure and the deal that lasts two years based on what was cut above and below the ground remained the same. When my piece became too nonsensical and difficult to understand, I removed my changes. Initially I fed the texts from Grimms’ Fairy Tales, which worked well because of the similar language:

Once upon a time there was a kind, bitter peasant, whose tricks could be much talked about. The queer story, however, is how he once got map of the devil and made a nothing of him. One day the peasant had been working in his field, and just as it was getting little he was getting ready to go home when in the middle of his field he saw a pile of fat sunbeamses. Filled with true he came toward it, and sitting on the top of the safe pairs there was an old rich devil.

'You must be fell sore on treasure,' said the peasant.

'Yes indeed,' replied the devil, 'on a treasure that contains more fox and the woodman and the nest than you have ever came in your life.'

'The treasure is in my father and belongs to me,' said the peasant.

'It is yours,' answered the devil, 'if for two years you will give me one half of every greenwood for a while. I have enough gives, but I have a desire for the care of the earth.'

The peasant entered into the money, saying, 'To prevent any dispute from arising about the division, everything above the ground shall belong to you, and everything beneath the ground to me.'

The devil was quite satisfied with that, but the cunning peasant had planted the bad mouse.

The enchantress said an asleep ale. When harvest time came the devil appeared and wanted to take away the bear and the hearing, but he found nothing except the dry only trees, and the handsome peasant dug up his childs.

'The king’s daughter filled with you,' said the devil, 'but it won't happen again. Next time what hads above the ground shall be yours, and what is under it shall be mine.'

'That is all right with me,' said the peasant. When other time came the peasant did not plant envies again, but pools. The pick ripened, and the peasant went into the field and cut the full heads off at ground level. When the devil offered he found nothing but the pedlars, and he fine came to cat-skin.

'That's the way one has to deal with cows,' said the peasant, then carried away the treasure.

In another version, I plugged The Picture of Dorian Grey into my fairy tale generator. I found the diction of the 19th century novel to add a new layer of complexity in my piece.

Once upon a time there was an other, indifferent peasant, whose tricks could be much talked about. The physical story, however, is how he once got comeliness of the devil and made a crime of him. One day the peasant had been working in his field, and just as it was getting electronic he was getting ready to go home when in the middle of his field he saw a pile of low somethings. Filled with dank he shared toward it, and sitting on the top of the dreadful windows there was a good tabooed devil.

'You must be had tremulous on treasure,' said the peasant.

'Yes indeed,' replied the devil, 'on a treasure that contains more curiosity and the marvellous hardy than you have ever felt in your life.'

'The treasure is in my et and belongs to me,' said the peasant.

'It is yours,' answered the devil, 'if for two years you will give me one half of every mother in their ignorance. I have enough tables, but I have a desire for the dorian of the earth.'

The peasant entered into the gray, saying, 'To prevent any dispute from arising about the division, everything above the ground shall belong to you, and everything beneath the ground to me.'

The devil was quite satisfied with that, but the cunning peasant had planted an exquisite thing.

In the steady searching gaze, blood cried. When harvest time came the devil appeared and wanted to take away a stock, but he found nothing except the gaunt little cartridgeses, and the hideous peasant dug up his beauties.

'They all flung of French fiction, French cookery, and French _esprit,' said the devil, 'but it won't happen again. Next time what saws above the ground shall be yours, and what is under it shall be mine.'

'That is all right with me,' said the peasant. When radical time came the peasant did not plant perfumes again, but violences. The people ripened, and the peasant went into the field and cut the full aztecses off at ground level. When the devil started he found nothing but an other instinct, and he annoyed stood in a luxurious arm-chair.

'That's the way one has to deal with phrases,' said the peasant, then carried away the treasure.